Spitfire in the Concentration Camp

Spitfire Site

Click to enlarge image This somewhat unique photograph shows a Spitfire Mk. V of No. 416 Squadron RCAF, DN-T, serial no. AB284, in captivity ...

Click to enlarge image

This somewhat unique photograph shows a Spitfire Mk. V of No. 416 Squadron RCAF, DN-T, serial no. AB284, in captivity at the concentration camp in Vught, the Netherlands.

The aircraft was shot down by ground fire during a Rhubarb mission between Goes and Tholen crashing by Bath (8 km south-west of Woensdrecht airfield) in the South of Holland on Nov. 25th, 1943, 14.35 hours Dutch time. The pilot, F/Sgt. P.R. Carpenter, was reportedly taken prisoner.

The aircraft was taken by the Germans to Vught to be dismantled by the Dutch political prisoners in the camp. Concentration camp Vught was officially referred to as Konzentrationslager-KL Herzogenbosch and was an establishment to imprison and torture prominent Dutch and Belgian citizens, also acting as a transit camp for Jews being deported to Germany.

The photo was most probably taken by a British soldier (?) after the liberation of Camp Vught in October 1944.
[Frank de Leeuw coll.]

10 Comments | Add New

By Brian Preston  |  2010-06-18 at 09:44  |  permalink

My dad Chris Preston just saw this photo on the wall in my home which I obtained from CFB Uplands photo unit in Ottawa years ago. He was a Spitfire pilot in No. 416 “City of Oshawa’, and he recognized it immediately!! He flew C for Charlie and a couple of others; he’s looking in his log book to see if he ever flew this kite.

By Andrew Goodale  |  2010-06-18 at 09:46  |  permalink

Brian,

I am building a 1:24 Spitfire Mk. V model, and would like it to be a 416 Squadron plane. In fact, I have been leaning towards the DN*C coding. Do you or your father happen to have any photos of 416 Spits? It would be neat for the build to end up being the plane your father flew, and I would love to make it as accurate as possible. I am specifically interested in photos of the “Leaping Lynx” nose insignia seen on some 416 Spits…

By John Engelsted  |  2013-05-06 at 17:59  |  permalink

Hi Brian.

I would love to get in touch about yout fathers logbook.

Please contact me at jejATlogit.dk (replace AT with @)

John Engelsted

By James French  |  2011-09-01 at 22:13  |  permalink

I may be imagining things but, the last digit of the serial number looks more like a ‘2’ than a ‘4’ to me, and the remains of the propeller hub looks like it could have been for a four bladed propeller. Could this aircraft actually be DN-T MJ832, a LFIX of 416 Squadron that was “Damaged by flak while attacking a train and abandoned over France 21-5-44”?

By Peter Arnold  |  2012-04-10 at 19:51  |  permalink

It is MJ832.

I have another image that clearly shows the serial.

PeterA

By Peter van Kaathoven  |  2012-04-13 at 19:40  |  permalink

Hello

My name is Peter van Kaathoven and i’m doing research about the Zerlegebetrieb within Kl. Herzogenbusch. I live in the town Vught and i’m working on the area where the Zerlgebetrieb
was in WWII. It’s now a Jail.

I have a big collection photograph’s over Zerlegebetrieb within Kl. Herzogenbusch.
I can tell you (100% proof) the Spit is really MJ832 DN-T, a LFIX of 416 Squadron

greetings Peter

By Kelvin T. Youngs  |  2014-03-16 at 01:39  |  permalink

I can conform that this is indeed the Spitfire IX MJ832 DN-T, flown by F/O. S.T. Lundberg of 416 Squadron. Abandoned after being hit by flak during an attack on a train.

We have the original, very high resolution photograph (PL33706), as supplied by the R.C.A.F. 19th Wing Museum of Canada. Prepared for us by Fred Paradie for the Paradie Archive, as shown on our website.

Great work on your website though.

Kelvin

By Peter van Kaathoven  |  2014-07-30 at 19:44  |  permalink

Hello Kevin

Do you mean that you have a high resolution photograph as publisched on top of this item?
Because off mine research I am very interrested in a digitail copy of this picture?

I know also the factory name off the Crane and where it whas taken (“loaned”) thru te Germas.

Greetings Peter

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