Latest comments

Spitfire Site

Latest Comments

Comments are free for anyone to use, and can be added to just about any article at this site. Here are the latest entries.

By ari, on Friday, 12 February at 13:18

(Watson Watt combined oscilloscope with directional antennae in 1923) It doesn't mean that he invented the RADAR . (Radio location was invented by Edward Victor Appleton in 1924.) All Groundwork with regard to Radio was done by Marconi before . ( Chain Home was the world’s first operational radar, 1936.) True, but it still doesn't mean Britain had invented it .German Freya system which was fully operational during Battle of Britain was far more advanced than British home chain. Watson Watt himself travelled to Germany in 1936 to find out more about this.. http://www.radarpages.co.uk/download/AUACSC0609F97-3.pdf Randall/Boot invent/pioneer bootstrapped cavity magnetron 1940. Magnetron was first invented in the US Albert Wallace Hull and Germans invented the resonant cavity magnetron long before Randall and Boot http://www.radartutorial.eu/04.history/pub/US2123728A.pdf Again, not invented in Britain but built in Britain first .. What this topic is about is the fact that the RADAR was not invented in Britain and Robert Watson Watt is not the inventor. Many countries made contributions to its refinement and development but British didn't

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By Alex, on Thursday, 11 February at 17:22

British first's: Watson Watt combined oscilloscope with directional antennae in 1923. Radio location was invented by Edward Victor Appleton in 1924. Appleton probes ionosphere with pulsed transmission 1926. Chain Home was the world's first operational radar, 1936. Bowen demonstrates, world's first airborne radar, 1937. Randall/Boot invent/pioneer bootstrapped cavity magnetron 1940. H2S, world's first airborne, ground mapping radar introduced, 1943.

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By Alex, on Wednesday, 10 February at 21:29

More magnetron details here: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=6735528

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By Alex, on Wednesday, 10 February at 21:00

What you say is essentially correct. However the bootstrapped cavity magnetron by Randall and Boot overcame the problems you mention. ie low power and frequency drift. This gave the allies significant advantage. Credit where it is due.

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By Alex, on Wednesday, 10 February at 20:42

The point I was making was that Appleton took his technology to the US. He was elected Vice president according to the following site: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1947/appleton-bio.html

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By Simon Ludlow, on Wednesday, 10 February at 8:03

The Germans failed to recognise the significance of the Chain Home system. Because the transmissions were different to their system, the didn't believe it was a radar, and any suggestion that it could have been may have been treated with disbelief because they assumed the British were not technically capable. They did bomb it, but ineffectively due to the use of small bombs delivered by the JU87, from which the blast just passed through the lattice structure of the Chain Home towers. This ineffective intelligence cost them the Battle of Britain. While speaking of intelligence, as for many weapons, it wasn't the device itself but how it was used. Chain Home wasn't just the radar, it was an integrated system which was proved to be extremely effective; far more so than any other application of radar in WW2. The Germans did have better radar, but little effective strategy to use it. For them, it was a tactical weapon as opposed to the strategic Chain Home system. It was until the Kammeraur line was established, but even then there were severe limitations on command and control of German radar, something which was exploited to the Allies advantage. (See 'Most Secret War' - R

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By Paul, on Friday, 22 January at 12:12

True that in the summer of 1940 Defiants were not being used for their designer's purpose, i.e. fighting unescorted bombers - but that role had become redundant as soon as the Germans occupied France. From June 1940 almost every German raid included a fighter escort, and on the odd occasions even when there was none, no-one would know for sure until contact was made. So it had to be assumed that German fighters would be encountered on every interception - meaning that the Defiant had been designed for a role that did not exist. True, it was pressed into service as a night bomber destroyer but despite what this article claims it actually made very little impression in that role. It was barely faster than most of the bombers it was meant to catch and its armament of .303 machine guns was inadequate. German bombers sometimes took hundreds of hits and remained airborne, especially by the time of the 1940-41 night blitz, by which point they had self-sealing fuel tanks and more armour. No wonder they had a loss rate of less than 1% against the Defiant. Despite the tone of this article the Defiant was indeed the abject failure of popular opinion.

In Stories of the Battle of Britain 1940 - Death of the Defiant »

By Michael Jordan, on Thursday, 21 January at 19:02

"So much owed, By so many, To so few." Thank you Flt Sgt J Smith.

In Circus 168 - In Memory of Sergeant William J. Smith »

By ari, on Monday, 18 January at 8:04

Both Spruance and Fletcher had radars designed and developed in the US that had nothing with British radars. Remember the word RADAR( Radio Detecting and Ranging ) came from American into the English language like the Software.. You are revelling in complete fantasy.. Let me ask you something mate, why do you insist on telling fantasy stories? do they make you feel comfortable ? or do you really believe in all these nonsese you posted? Let me give you an analogy.. Rolls Royce Merlin engine to P-51 Mustang is MIT Radiation Labs to Magnetron !

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By ari, on Sunday, 17 January at 15:52

''For example Robert Watson-Watt invented the Cathode Ray Oscilloscope essential to a complete radar system as well as Ionosondes for measuring time delay of received radio echos.'' What ??? this is the funniest claim ever heard mate.. If this what you say is true, you change the history mate what do you think we should do with this guy ? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Ferdinand_Braun As I always say British version of truth and facts are different from the rest of the world..Next we will hear the Brits have invented the SaturnV rocket, anybody surprised ?

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By ari, on Sunday, 17 January at 15:42

Cavity magnetron was not invented in Britain mate..Another British delusion even worse than the claim ' Computer was invented by Charles Babbage in 1830's ' http://www.radartutorial.eu/04.history/pub/US2123728A.pdf Birmingham profs simply plundered the German patent.. I never heard that any US scientist or engineer saying that the all moving tail was invented in the US.. Actually it was invented by Alfred Fokker the flying Dutchman during WW1 as aerodynamic stabilator. M52 is another story, a conspiracy theory in which the Brits excel really. Unfortunately nobody believes it outside Britain or possibly in Australia.. I love how the brits persist in the myth that the Stabilator was invented during the Miles M.52 project lol!!! Fokker Eindecker featured a stabilator in 1915....

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »

By ari, on Sunday, 17 January at 15:34

Biased? absolutely not..Very informative and factual ..

In Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II »